December 28, 2017

Karma Yoga

Karma yoga, also called Karma marga, is one of the several spiritual paths in Hinduism, one based on the “yoga of action” To a karma yogi, right work done well is a form of prayer. It is one of the paths in the spiritual practices of Hindus, others being Raja yoga, Jnana yoga (path of knowledge) and Bhakti yoga (path of loving devotion to a personal god). The three paths are not mutually exclusive in Hinduism, but the relative emphasis between Karma yoga, Jnana yoga and Bhakti yoga varies by the individual.

Of the paths to spiritual liberation in Hinduism, karma yoga is the path of unselfish action. It teaches that a spiritual seeker should act according to dharma, without being attached to the fruits or personal consequences. Karma Yoga, states the Bhagavad Gita, purifies the mind. It leads one to consider dharma of work, and the work according to one’s dharma, doing god’s work and in that sense becoming and being “like unto god Krishna” in every moment of one’s life

Karma yoga (also called karmamarga) is the spiritual practice of “selfless action performed for the benefit of others” Karma yoga is a path to reach spiritual moksha (liberation) through work. It is rightful action without being attached to fruits or being manipulated by what the results might be, a dedication to one’s duty, and trying one’s best while being neutral to rewards or outcomes such as success or failure

The tendency for a human being to seek the fruits of action is normal, state Hindu texts, but an exclusive attachment to fruits and positive immediate consequences can compromise dharma (ethical, rightful action). Karma yoga, states Bilimoria, is “ethically fine-tuned action”.According to Stephen Phillips, a professor of philosophy and Asian studies, “only dharmic action” is suitable in karma yoga, where one downplays one’s own exclusive role or one’s own exclusive interests. Instead, the karma yogi considers the interests of all parties impartially, all beings, the elements of Prakṛti and then does the right thing. However, adds Phillips, there are commentators who disagree and state “any action can be done as karma yoga” and it doesn’t have to be consistent with dharma

Karma yoga, states Bilimoria, does not mean forfeiture of emotions or desires, rather it means action driven by “equanimity, balance”, with “dispassion, disinterest”, avoiding “one sidedness, fear, craving, favoring self or one group or clan, self-pity, self-aggrandizement or any form of extreme reactiveness”. A Karma yogi acts and does his or her duty, whether that be as “a homemaker, mother, nurse, carpenter or garbage collector, with no thought for one’s own fame, privilege or financial reward, but simply as a dedication to the Lord”, states Harold Coward – professor of Religious Studies with a focus on Indian religions.

Christo

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